Green & Black Belt

1 of 7Project Selection & Scope

Ultimately, Champions have the final say in selecting projects. However, Black and Green Belts often play an active role in project selection, as well. This could include:

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

2 of 7Project Kickoff

The Black or Green Belt is responsible for organizing and managing the LSS project team. This includes the project kickoff meeting. The kickoff meeting should include:

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

3 of 7Champion Reviews

The Black or Green Belt is responsible for periodically meeting with the Champion to review the project. The Belt is responsible for ensuring a schedule is set up for these meetings. At a minimum, the meetings should cover:

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

4 of 7Technical Reviews

Every LSS project goes through a series of regularly scheduled technical reviews with a higher level Belt who serves as a coach. These reviews are designed to:

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

5 of 7Team Meetings

Every project has regularly scheduled project review meetings. As the team leader, the Belt is responsible for meeting facilitation. This includes:

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

6 of 7Project Closure

At some point, a decision is made to close the project. The Champion is responsible for this decision, but the Black or Green Belt has input. Some key considerations in this decision are:

Sometimes the best decision is to terminate prior to reaching the goal. Other times, it may make sense to attempt to exceed the goal.

The biggest challenges will be:

Green & Black Belt

7 of 7PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX

Green - The project has less than the maximum level of risk the organization can tolerate, and it also exceeds the required minimum reward-risk ratio.

Yellow - The project exceeds the required minimum reward-risk ratio, but has more than the maximum level of risk the organization can tolerate.

Red - The project has more than the maximum level of risk the organization can tolerate, and it also fails to meet the required minimum reward-risk ratio.